Church Ministry Teams: Pt. 2 [Blog]

The health of a ministry team will be its greatest asset to effectiveness.Church Minstry Teams 2

Teams are almost always assembled to accomplish a singular task or goal. This beginning point tends to point a team into activity-driven goals and motion.  The problem is an effective team is not marked by its activity or motion, but by its internal health.  A strong and heathy team will by far out produce a busy one. Read Part One on Ministry Teams

Here are a few areas help you focus on creating a healthy ministry team at your local church.

  1. Debate- A strong and effective team is not a “Yes Team”.  If the ideas of the leader do not receive some type of filtering and refinement, then you don’t have a team. You just have a meeting with the boss giving orders and direction. Granted, there are some meetings and times when the leader needs to lead, but this cannot be the majority of the time.  There needs to be an ample supply of that “mutual trust” that members can freely discuss, debate and decided on the BEST option.  Here is a sign of a bad team meeting: You are the only one talking. The Fix: craft questions that create member feedback and then begin to listen better. View yourself as the collector of ideas and options. List all of the multiple options on a white board. Review each. Refine and discuss. Don’t fear debate and discussion. It is your friend.
  2. Caring Foretalk: Plan enough margin in your meeting schedules to be able to listen to and discuss team member  chatter. What I mean by “chatter” is the personal needs and problems that can often get overlooked in an activity-driven style of meeting. People talk about things they care about, and just listening and asking a few caring questions can set the tone for a great meeting of discussion and accomplishment. It is much easier to listen to dissenting ideas and grind out tough solutions when you know the folks across the table care for you personally. Being kind and tenderhearted is biblical, but it is also good leadership.
  3. Service Moments: Exercising together is one of the greatest attributes of a healthy local church team.  I don’t mean going to the gym or running a 5K together though. What I am saying is, doing an event or a major project together.  You might say, “we do that all the time, every Sunday, etc…” Well here is what often happens. We conduct a big event, but everyone is in their separate place, doing their own thing and it does not seem like we are “serving together”. Here are a few tips for making it a team event:
  • Have More “prep” Meetings- Meet right before event for V.I.P. Vision, Information and Prayer.
  • Acknowledge One Another-In mid-event make sure to honor one another with praise and encouragement.
  • Assist One Another- Always be asking these questions. “What can I do for you?”  or, “Is there anything here that could use my assistance?”
  • Meet Immediately After for Evaluation- Formal eval may come later, but good teams slap some high fives right there on the sidelines.

Conclusion: The healthiest teams are the most effective teams. A strong trusting, loving, and exercising ministry team will be one of the local church’s greatest assets!  Work hard and make it so!

Question: What attributes of a heathy team have you seen lately?

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